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51 The Manichaeans, to wit.

52 Gen. i. 31.

53 Proprietas [The Greeks call it idiw/thj or idion, i. e. the propriety or characteristic individuality of each divine person, namely the fatherhood, paternitas, a/gennhsia, of the first person; the sonship, filiatio, generatio gennhsia, of the second person; the procession, processio, e'kpo/reusij, of the third person.-P. S.]

54 This is one of the passages cited by Sir William Hamilton, along with the Cogito, ergo sum of Descartes, in confirmation of his proof, that in so far as we are conscious of certain modes of existence, in so far we possess an absolute certainty that we exist. See note A in Hamilton's Reid, p. 744.

55 Compare the Confessions, xiii. 9.

56 Ch. 7.

57 Vitium: perhaps "fault," most nearly embraces all the uses of this word.

58 Or aliquot parts.

59 Comp. Aug. Gen. ad Lit. iv. 2, and De Trinitate, iv. 7.

60 For passages illustrating early opinions regarding numbers, see Smith's Dict. art. Number.

61 Wisd. xi. 20.

62 Prov. xxiv. 16.

63 Ps. cxix. 164.

64 Ps. xxxiv. 1.

65 John xvi. 13.

66 In Isa. xi. 2, as he shows in his eighth sermon, where this subject is further pursued; otherwise, one might have supposed he referred to Rev. iii. 1.

67 l Cor. xiii. 10.

68 Augustin refers to John viii. 25; see p. 195. He might rather have referred to Rev. iii. 14.

69 Ps. civ. 24.

70 Matt. xxii. 30.

71 Matt. xviii. 10.

72 2 Peter ii. 4.

73 Eph. v. 8.

74 Ps. cxlviii. 2.

75 Matt. iv. 9.

76 Jas. iv. 6.

77 1 Thess. v. 5.

78 Augustin himself published this idea in his Conf. xiii. 32 but afterwards retracted it, as "said without sufficient consideration" (Retract. II. vi. 2). Epiphanius and Jerome ascribe it to Origen.

79 Gen. i. 6.

80 Namely, the Audians and Sampsaeans, insignificant heretical sects mentioned by Theodoret and Epiphanius.

1 Matt. x. 28.

2 Essentia.

3 Ex. iii. 14.

4 Quintilian calls it dura.

5 With this may be compared the argument of Socrates in the Gorgias, in which it is shown that to escape punishment is worse than to suffer it, and that the greatest of evils is to do wrong and not be chastised.

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