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Title:Autocephalous Orthodox Churches centered at Constantinople
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Body:The 5 Tier Hierarchy of the Orthodox Church: (Ecumenical Patriarch, Patriarchs, Metropolitans, Bishops, Priests) Click to View Learn from the Bible Blueprint, how the church was organized by the apostles! Click to View Find a local congregation of the New Testament church that is organized exactly as the Bible says Click to View 30-606 AD: The gradual historical Development of the Papal and Patriarchal Systems of Centralized Church Government away from the organization found in the Bible.

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Organization and Hierarchy of Autocephalous Orthodox Churches, centered at Constantinople Orthodox Creed and Catechism

Hierarchy of the Autocephalous Orthodox Churches (Constantinople)

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14 equal Patriarchs, where the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople is considered "first among equals".

1 Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Click to View 13 Patriarchs (Autocephalous churches) Click to View Metropolitans Click to View Bishops Click to View Priests/Parishes (Local churches)

Learn the Truth:

Click to View The office of Elders, pastors and bishops

Click to View The New Testament Church has no world headquarters!

I. Introduction to Autocephalous Orthodox Churches centered at Constantinople

There are fourteen Orthodox churches that are generally accepted as "autocephalous," which in Greek means "self-headed." An autocephalous church possesses the right to resolve all internal problems on its own authority and the ability to choose its own bishops, including the Patriarch, Archbishop or Metropolitan who heads the church. While each autocephalous church acts independently, they all remain in full sacramental and canonical communion with one another. Today these autocephalous Orthodox churches include the four ancient Eastern Patriarchates (Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem), and ten other Orthodox churches that have emerged over the centuries in Russia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Georgia, Cyprus, Greece, Poland, Albania, and the Czech and Slovak Republics. On its own initiative, the Patriarchate of Moscow has granted autocephalous status to most of its parishes in North America under the name of the Orthodox Church in America. But since the Patriarchate of Constantinople claims the exclusive right to grant autocephalous status, it and most other Orthodox churches do not recognize the autocephaly of the American church. Nine of these autocephalous churches are Patriarchates: Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, Russia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria and Georgia. The others are headed by an Archbishop or Metropolitan. At the level of church government, Orthodoxy is a communion of churches, all of which recognize the Patriarch of Constantinople as primus inter pares, or "first among equals." Although he does not have authority to intervene in the affairs of local churches outside his own Patriarchate, he is considered first in honor and the symbolic center of all the Orthodox churches. Thus the Patriarchate of Constantinople (also known as the Ecumenical Patriarchate) enjoys a certain priority among the various Orthodox churches. (CNEWA)

Who fell away from who?

I just laugh when Roman Catholics and Orthodox both claim their church has the authority to determine doctrine and that the Protestants are divided into many factions. Of course, the Orthodox claim they, not the Roman Catholic church are the one true apostolic church and depict the Roman Catholics "falling away" in 1054 AD. Roman Catholics use the same chart but have the Orthodox "falling away" from them. But the point remains, that Roman Catholics claim they are the apostolic church based upon tradition and Orthodox claim they are the apostolic church based upon tradition. Let me quote an Orthodox Father named Raymond L. Zell, in his booklet called, "Scripture and tradition." Pg. 2: "Wait a minute! How can so many contradictory statements be based upon" apostolic tradition? "How can intelligent and sensible people" claim to be the apostolic church, "yet arrive at such opposite conclusions?"

Here is a time line of history produced by the Orthodox church:

Click to View

II. Understanding ranks and titles within Autocephalous Orthodox Churches centered at Constantinople:

There is a consistent terminology of titles that corresponds to various positions that are through out this group of churches. A leaders rank can easily be determined by his title. Now rank in Autocephalous Orthodox Churches, is different than in the vertically structured, military like, monolithic organization of the Roman Catholic church. In Autocephalous churches, people of varying titles all have the same power to vote in church matters and policy making. The Roman Catholic church is organized from the top down and the Autocephalous orthodox churches are organized from the bottom up. The Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople is called, "first among equals".

Position

Title

Number

Ecumenical Patriarch

His All Holiness

One in the world

Patriarch

His Beatitude

17 in the world

Metropolitan or Archbishop

His Eminence

Territorial leaders of country, region or city

Bishop

His Grace

Territorial leaders of region or city

Archpriest, Pastor

Very Reverend

Pulpit preacher

Protopresbyter

Right Reverend

Pulpit preacher

Pastor

Reverend Father

Pulpit preacher

III. Graphic view of the Autocephalous Orthodox Churches centered at Constantinople

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IV. 14 Equal Patriarchs of the Autocephalous Orthodox Churches centered at Constantinople

First level: 14 Equal Patriarchs

Classification

Second level under Patriarch

Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople

Eastern Autocephalous

25 Metropolitans

Patriarchate of Alexandria

Eastern Autocephalous

15 Metropolitans

Patriarch of Antioch: The Orthodox Church of Antioch

Eastern Autocephalous

26 Metropolitans

The Patriarch of Jerusalem

Eastern Autocephalous

15 Metropolitans

The Patriarchate of Georgia

Western Autocephalous

26 Metropolitans

Patriarch of Serbia: The Church of Serbia

Western Autocephalous

13 Metropolitans

The Patriarchate of Romania

Western Autocephalous

6 Metropolitans

Patriarch of Bulgaria: The Bulgarian Orthodox Church

Western Autocephalous

9 Metropolitans

Patriarch of Moscow: The Russian Orthodox Church

Western Autocephalous

33 Metropolitans

The Church of Cyprus

Western Autocephalous

9 Metropolitans

The Church of Greece

Western Autocephalous

74 Metropolitans

The Orthodox Church of Albania

Western Autocephalous

3 Metropolitans

The Church of Poland

Western Autocephalous

7 Metropolitans

The Church of the Czech Lands and Slovakia

Western Autocephalous

2 Metropolitans

V. Six Independent and Autonomous Orthodox churches that are in communion with Constantinople, but are dependant upon one of the above 14 Patriarchs to confirm their own top leaders.

There are Six Orthodox churches which, although functioning independently on a day-to-day basis, are canonically dependent on an autocephalous Orthodox church. In practice this means that the head of an autonomous church must be confirmed in office by the Holy Synod of its mother autocephalous church. The Orthodox churches of Finland and Estonia are dependent on the Ecumenical Patriarchate, and Mount Sinai is dependent on the Patriarchate of Jerusalem. In addition, the Moscow Patriarchate has granted autonomous status to its Orthodox daughter churches in Japan and China, but these actions have not been recognized by the Ecumenical Patriarchate. (CNEWA)

Autonomous church

Dependency

Number of Metropolitans other than the head.

Click to View The Orthodox Church of Finland

Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Constantinople

1 Metropolitans

Click to View Estonian Apostolic Orthodox Church

Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Constantinople

0 Metropolitans

Click to View The Orthodox Church of China

Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Moscow

0 Metropolitans

Click to View The Orthodox Church in America

Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Moscow

10 Metropolitans

Click to View The Orthodox Church of Japan

Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Moscow

0 Metropolitans

Click to View The Church of Sinai

Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Jerusalem

0 Metropolitans

VI. Six Canonical Churches Under Constantinople:

These are churches which, because of special circumstances or political turmoil in their countries of origin, have been received under the canonical protection of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The Patriarchate provides these churches with Holy Chrism and confirms the election of their bishops. (CNEWA)

Click to View 1. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada: His Beatitude Wasyly, Metropolitan of all Canada, Archbishop of Winnipeg and Central Diocese, Primate of The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada (Canonical Church Under Constantinople) His Eminence John, Archbishop of Edmonton and the Western Diocese, The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada His Eminence Yurij, Archbishop of Toronto, Bishop of the Eastern Diocese, The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada

Click to View 2. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA: His Beatitude Constantine, Metropolitan of all USA, Eparchial Bishop: Central Eparchy (Canonical Church Under Constantinople) His Eminence Archbishop Antony, Eparchial Bishop: Eastern Eparchy, The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA His Eminence Archbishop Vsevolod, Eparchial Bishop: Western Eparchy, The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA

Click to View 3. The American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese of the USA: His Eminence Metropolitan Nicholas, Titular Metropolitan of Amissos; (Canonical Church Under Constantinople)

Click to View 4. Russian Orthodox Patriarchal Exarch of Western Europe: His Eminence Archbishop Gabriel de Vylder; (Canonical Church Under Constantinople)

Click to View 5. Albanian Orthodox Diocese of America: Reverend Ilia Katre, Vicar General; (Canonical Church Under Constantinople)

Click to View 6. Belarusan Council of Orthodox Churches in North America: Very Reverend Sviatoslaw Kous, Administrator; (Canonical Church Under Constantinople)\

VII. The Structure of the 14 Autocephalous orthodox churches

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The 14 Autocephalous orthodox churches: In communion with the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople

1. Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople

The Orthodox Church of Finland; His Beatitude Archbishop Leo; Archbishop of Karelia and All Finland, Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Constantinople; His Eminence; Ambrosius: Metropolitan of Oulu and Lapland

The Estonian Apostolic Orthodox Church: Metropolitan Stephanos, Metropolitan of Tallinn and All Estonia; Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Constantinople

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His All Holiness Bartholomew: Archbishop of Constantinople and New Rome, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople

His Eminence Chrysostom: Metropolitan of the Senior See of Ephesus

His Eminence Joachim: Metropolitan of the Senior See of Chalcedon

His Eminence Iakovos: Metropolitan of Laodicea

His Eminence Meliton: Metropolitan of Philadelphia

His Eminence Emilianos: Metropolitan of Silybria

His Eminence Panteleimon: Metropolitan of Tyroloi and Serentia

His Eminence John: Metropolitan of Pergamon

His Eminence Apostolos: Metropolitan of Moschonision

His Eminence Demetrios: Metropolitan of Sebasteia

His Eminence Paisios: Metropolitan of Tyana

His Eminence Spyridon

His Grace Vikentios: Bishop of Apamea

His Eminence Sotirios: Metropolitan, Archbishop, Prelate; Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Toronto (Canada)

His Eminence Timotheos III, Archbishop of Crete

His Eminence Demetrios, Archbishop of America, Primate of The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Iakovos of Chicago, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Anthony of San Francisco, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Maximos of Pittsburgh, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Methodios of Boston, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Isaiah of Denver, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Alexios of Atlanta, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Nicholas of Detroit, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America His Eminence Metropolitan Evangelos of New Jersey, The Greek (Eastern) Orthodox Church in America

His Eminence: Stylianos, Archbishop, The Greek Orthodox Church in Australia His Grace Bishop Ezekiel of Dervis, The Greek Orthodox Church in Australia His Grace Bishop Seraphim of Apollonias, The Greek Orthodox Church in Australia His Grace Bishop Nikandros of Dorileou, The Greek Orthodox Church in Australia

His Eminence Metropolitan Nikitas of Hong Kong and South-east Asia

His Eminence Metropolitan Joseph, The Orthodox Archdioces of New Zealand, Exarch of Korea and Japan. The Orthodox Church in Korea The Orthodox Church in Japan

His Eminence the Metropolitan Jeremias of France.

2. Patriarchate of Alexandria

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His Beatitude PETROS VII; Pope and Patriarch of Alexandria and all Africa

His Eminence Paul: Metropolitan of Memphis

His Eminence Dionysios: Metropolitan of Leontopolis

His Eminence Ireneos: Metropolitan of Pelusion

His Eminence Petros: Metropolitan of Axum

His Eminence Chrysostomos: Metropolitan of Carthage

His Eminence Theodoros: Metropolitan of Zimbabwe

His Eminence Ionas: Metropolitan of Kampala and All Uganda

His Eminence Makarios: Metropolitan of Kenya and Irinoupolis

His Eminence Seraphim: Metropolitan of Johannesburg and Pretoria

His Eminence Sergios: Metropolitan of Good Hope

His Eminence Kallinikos: Metropolitan of Khartoum & All Sudan

His Eminence Nikolaos: Metropolitan of Hermopolis

His Eminence Proterios: Metropolitan of Dar Es Salaam

His Eminence Dimitrios: Metropolitan of Cameroon

His Eminence Ignatios: Metropolitan of Central Africa

3. Patriarch of Antioch: The Orthodox Church of Antioch

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His Beatitude Ignatius IV: Patriarch of Antioch and All the East

His Eminence Elias: Metropolitan of Tripoli and el-Koura

His Eminence Philip: Metropolitan of New York and North America

His Eminence Spyridon: Metropolitan of Zahle and Baalbek

His Eminence Constantine: Metropolitan of Baghdad and Kuwait

His Eminence George: Metropolitan of Byblos and Batroun (Mount Lebanon)

His Eminence John: Metropolitan of Lattakya

His Eminence Elias: Metropolitan of Beirut

His Eminence Paul: Metropolitan of Akkar

His Eminence Elia: Metropolitan of Hamah

His Eminence Elias: Metropolitan of Tyre and Sydon and Marjiyoun

His Eminence Sergios: Metropolitan of Chile

His Eminence Antonios: Metropolitan of Mexico

His Eminence Kyrillos: Metropolitan of Argentina

His Eminence Damaskinos: Metropolitan of Sao Paolo

His Eminence Saba: Metropolitan of Bosra, Hawran and Jabal el-Arab

His Eminence Gabriel: Metropolitan of Western and Central Europe

His Eminence Paul: Metropolitan of Aleppo

His Eminence Paul: Metropolitan of Sydney and All Australia

His Eminence George: Metropolitan of Homs

His Grace Antoun: Bishop of Seleucia: Auxiliary Bishop of North America

His Grace Joseph: Auxiliary Bishop of North America

His Grace Basil: Bishop of Enfeh al-Koura: Auxiliary Bishop of North America

His Grace Demetri: Auxiliary Bishop of North America

His Grace Luke: Bishop of Saydnaya

His Grace Ghattas: Titular Bishop of Kara, Patriarchal Vicar

His Grace Yuhanna: Bishop of El-Hosn

4. The Patriarch of Jerusalem

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His Beatitude Eireneos: Patriarch of the Holy City of Jerusalem and All Palestine

The Orthodox Church of Mount Sinai; His Eminence Archbishop Damianos; Abbot of St. Catherine's Monastery, Archbishop of Sinai, Pharan, and Raitho; Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Jerusalem

His Eminence; Cornelius: Metropolitan of Petras

His Eminence; Amvrosios: Metropolitan of Neapoli

His Eminence; Arkadios: Metropolitan of Ashqelon

His Eminence; Arkadios: Metropolitan of Skithopolis

His Eminence; Damaskinos: Metropolitan of Jaffa

His Eminence; Christodoulos: Metropolitan of Eleutheroupoli

His Eminence; Palladios: Metropolitan of Ptolemais

His Eminence; Timotheos: Metropolitan of Bostra

His Eminence; Alexios: Archbishop of Tiberias

His Eminence; Benedict: Archbishop of Gaza

His Eminence; Aristarchos: Archbishop of Constantinis

His Eminence; Methodios: Archbishop

His Eminence; Silvestros: Archbishop of Kiriakoupoli

His Eminence; Theophylaktos: Archbishop

His Grace Daniel: Bishop

5. The Patriarchate of Georgia

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His Holiness Ilia: Archbishop of Mtsheta and Tbilisi, Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia

His Eminence; Constantine: Metropolitan of Margveti

His Eminence; Atanase: Metropolitan of Rustavi

His Eminence; Kalistrate: Metropolitan of Kutais-Gaenati

His Eminence; Tadeoz: Archbishop of Bolnisi and Dmanisi

His Eminence; Anania: Archbishop of Manglisi and Tsalka

His Eminence; Vakhtang: Archbishop of Samtavisi and Gori

His Eminence; Zosime: Archbishop of Tsilkani

His Eminence; Giorgi: Archbishop of Tchkondidi

His Eminence; Job: Archbishop of Urbnisi and Ruisi

His Eminence; Daniel: Archbishop of Tskhum-Apkhazeti

His Eminence; Daviti: Archbishop of Alaverdi

His Eminence; Abraam: Archbishop of Chiatura

His Eminence; Sergi: Archbishop of Nekresi

His Grace Ioseb: Bishop of Shemokmedi

His Grace Isaia: Bishop of Nikozi and Tskhinvali

His Grace Seraphim: Bishop of Borjomi and Akhalkalaki

His Grace Elise: Bishop of Nikortsminda

His Grace Grigoli: Bishop of Poti

His Grace Nikolozi: Bishop of Bodbe

His Grace Theodore: Bishop of Akhaltsikhe

His Grace Saba: Bishop of Khoni

His Grace Dimitri: Bishop of Batumi and Skhalta

His Grace Antoni: Bishop of Vani and Bagdati

His Grace Gerasime: Bishop of Zugdidi and Tsaishi

His Grace Daviti: Bishop of Tsageri and Svaneti

His Grace Andria: Bishop of Sagarejo and Gurjaani

6. Patriarch of Serbia: The Church of Serbia

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His Holiness Pavle (Paul I): Archbishop of Pec,: Metropolitan of Belgrade-Karlovci: Patriarch of Serbia

1. His Eminence; Jovan: Metropolitan of Zagreb and Ljubljana

2. His Eminence; Amfilohije: Metropolitan of Montenegro and the Coastlands

3. His Eminence; Christopher: Metropolitan of Midwestern America

4. His Grace Lavrentije: Bishop of Shabac-Valjevo

5. His Grace Georgije: Bishop of Canada

6. His Grace Mitrophan: Bishop of Eastern America

7. His Grace Dositej: Bishop of Great Britain and Sweden

8. His Grace Artemije: Bishop of Raska and Prizren

9. His Grace Konstantin: Bishop of Central Europe

10. His Grace Luka: Bishop of Western Europe

11. His Grace Justin: Bishop of Timok

12. His Grace Jovan: Bishop of Western America

13. His Grace Ignatije: Bishop of Branicevo

7. The Patriarchate of Romania

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His Beatitude Teoctist, Archbishop of Bucharest: Metropolitan of Ungro-Vlachia,: Patriarch of All Romania

1. His Eminence; Serafim: Metropolitan of Germany and Central Europe

2. His Eminence; Daniel: Metropolitan of Moldavia

3. His Eminence; Teofan: Metropolitan of Oltenia

4. His Eminence; Joseph: Archbishop of Western and Central Europe

5. His Eminence; Nicolae: Archbishop of America and Canada

6. His Grace Ambrozie: Bishop of Sinaitul

8. Patriarch of Bulgaria: The Bulgarian Orthodox Church

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His Holiness Maxim: Patriarch of Bulgaria

His Eminence; Grigory: Metropolitan of Lovetch

His Eminence; Kalinik: Metropolitan of Vratza

His Eminence; Arsenii: Metropolitan of Plovdiv

His Eminence; Dometiyan: Metropolitan of Vidin

His Eminence; Kyrill: Metropolitan of Varna and Veliki Preslav

His Eminence; Simeon: Metropolitan of Western and Central Europe

His Eminence; Grigory: Metropolitan of Veliko Turnovo

His Eminence; Neofit: Metropolitan of Dorostol and Tcherven

His Eminence; Nathanail: Metropolitan of Nevrokrop

9. Patriarch of Moscow: The Russian Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church of Japan; His Eminence Daniel; Archbishop of Tokyo, Metropolitan of All Japan; Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Moscow

Orthodox Church of China; Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Moscow

The Orthodox Church in America: His Beatitude Herman: Archbishop of Washington,: Metropolitan of All America and Canada; Autonomous but canonically dependent on the Patriarchate of Moscow

His Eminence; Kyrill: Archbishop of Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania and the Bulgarian Diocese

His Eminence; Peter: Archbishop of New York and New Jersey

His Eminence; Dmitri: Archbishop of Dallas and the South, Exarch of Mexico

His Eminence; Nathaniel: Archbishop of Detroit and the Romanian Episcopate

His Grace Job: Bishop of Chicago and the Midwest

His Grace Tikhon: Bishop of San Francisco and the West

His Grace Seraphim: Bishop of Ottawa and Canada

His Grace Nikolai: Bishop of Sitka and Alaska

His Grace Nikon: Bishop-elect of Baltimore

His Grace Irineu: Bishop-elect of Dearborn Heights

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His Holiness Aleksii II: Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia

His Beatitude Vladimir: Metropolitan of Kiev and All Ukraine

His Eminence; Vladimir: Metropolitan of Saint Petersburg and Ladoga

His Eminence; Yuvenalii: Metropolitan of Krutitsy and Kolomena

His Beatitude Filaret: Metropolitan of Minsk and Slutsk; Exarch of All Belorussia

His Eminence; Kirill: Metropolitan of Smolensk and Kaliningrad

His Eminence; Sergii: Archbishop of Solnechnogorsk

His Eminence; Leontii: Metropolitan of Orenburg and Buzuluk

His Eminence; Nikodim: Metropolitan of Kharkov and Bogodukhov

His Eminence; Nikolai: Metropolitan of Nizhegorod and Arzamas

His Eminence; Feodosii: Metropolitan of Omsk and Tarsk

His Eminence; Pitirim: Metropolitan of Volokolamsk and Yuriev; Vicar of the Diocese of Moscow

His Eminence; Antonii: Metropolitan of Chernigov and Nezhinsk

His Eminence; Irinei: Metropolitan of Vienna and Austria

His Eminence; Feodosii: Metropolitan of Poltava and Kremenchuga

His Eminence; Gedeon: Metropolitan of Stavropol and Vladikavkaz

His Eminence; Serapion: Metropolitan of Tula and Belev

His Eminence; Agafangel: Metropolitan of Odessa and Izmail'sk

His Eminence; Mefodii: Metropolitan of Voronezh and Lipetsk

His Eminence; Vladimir: Metropolitan of Kishinev and All Moldova

His Eminence; Nifont: Metropolitan of Lutsk and Volyna

His Eminence; Melkhisedek: Archbishop of Bryansk and Sevsk

His Eminence; Nikolai: Archbishop of Ramena; Vicar of the Diocese of Moscow

His Eminence; German: Archbishop of Volgograd and Kamyshin

His Eminence; Makarii: Archbishop of Vinnitsa and Mogilev-Podol'e

His Eminence; Maksim: Archbishop of Mogilev and Mstislav

His Eminence; Khrizostom: Archbishop of Vilnius and Lithuania

His Eminence; Anatolii: Archbishop of Kerchensk; Vicar of the Diocese of Sourozh

His Eminence; Simon: Archbishop of Ryazan and Kasimov

His Eminence; Platon: Archbishop of Argentina and South America

His Eminence; Iov: Archbishop of Chelyabinsk and Zlatoustov

His Eminence; Irinei: Archbishop of Dnepropetrovsk and Pavlograd

His Eminence; Yuvenalii: Archbishop of Kursk and Ryla

His Eminence; Varnava: Archbishop of Cheboksary and Chuvash

10. The Church of Cyprus

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His Beatitude Chrysostomos: Archbishop of New Justiniana and All Cyprus

His Eminence; Chrysostomos: Metropolitan of Paphos

His Eminence; Chrysostomos: Metropolitan of Kitium

His Eminence; Pavlos: Metropolitan of Kyrenia

His Eminence; Athanasios: Metropolitan of Limassol

His Eminence; Neophytos: Metropolitan of Morphos

His Grace Varnavas: Bishop of Salamis

His Grace Vassilios: Bishop of Trimithous

His Grace Georgios: Bishop of Arsinoe

His Grace Nikephoros: Bishop of Kykko

11. The Church of Greece

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His Beatitude Christodoulos: Archbishop of Athens and All Greece

His Eminence; Chrysostom: Metropolitan of Messinia

His Eminence; Panteleimon: Metropolitan of Corinth

His Eminence; Stefanos: Metropolitan of Triphylia and Olympia

His Eminence; Synesios: Metropolitan of Kassandreia

His Eminence; Dorotheos: Metropolitan of Syros, Tinos, Kea and Milos

His Eminence; Thekletos: Metropolitan of Aitolia and Acarnania

His Eminence; Panteleimon: Metropolitan of Thessaloniki

His Eminence; Nikodemos: Metropolitan of Patrai

His Eminence; Dionysios: Metropolitan of Drama

His Eminence; Ioannis: Metropolitan of Siderokastron

His Eminence; Spyridon: Metropolitan of Lagkadas

His Eminence; Apostolos: Metropolitan of Poliana and Kilkis

His Eminence; Nikephoros: Metropolitan of Leukas and Ithaki

His Eminence; Serapheim: Metropolitan of Karystia and Skyros

His Eminence; Theophilos: Metropolitan of Gortys and Megalopolis

His Eminence; Serapheim: Metropolitan of Stagoi and Meteora

His Eminence; Agathonikos: Metropolitan of Mesogaia and Lavreotiki

His Eminence; Bartholomew: Metropolitan of Megara and Salamis

His Eminence; Spyridon: Metropolitan of Zichnai and Nevrokopion

His Eminence; Damaskinos: Metropolitan of Maroneia and Komotini

His Eminence; Antonios: Metropolitan of Sisanion and Siatista

His Eminence; Prokopios: Metropolitan of Philippoi, Neapolis and Thasos

His Eminence; Prokopios: Metropolitan of Nea Krini and Kalamaria

His Eminence; Dionysios: Metropolitan of Neapolis and Stavroupolis

His Eminence; Anthimos: Metropolitan of Alexandroupolis

His Eminence; Ambrose: Metropolitan of Paronaxia

His Eminence; Titus: Metropolitan of Paramythia, Philata, Geromerion and Parga

His Eminence; Agathangelos: Metropolitan of Nea Smyrni

His Eminence; Kallinikos: Metropolitan of Piraeus

His Eminence; Theokletos: Metropolitan of Ioannina

His Eminence; Chrysostom: Metropolitan of Peristerion

His Eminence; Spyridon: Metropolitan of Kephallinia

His Eminence; Chrysostom: Metropolitan of Zakynthos

His Eminence; Ambrose: Metropolitan of Kalavryta and Aigialeia

His Eminence; Alexios: Metropolitan of Trikki and Stagoi

His Eminence; Panteleimon: Metropolitan of Attica

His Eminence; Nicholas: Metropolitan of Karpenision

His Eminence; Meletios: Metropolitan of Nikopolis and Preveza

His Eminence; Eustathios: Metropolitan of Monemvasia and Sparta

His Eminence; Nikodemos: Metropolitan of Ierissos, Agion Oros and Ardamerion

His Eminence; Germanos: Metropolitan of Eleia and Oleni

His Eminence; Hieronymos: Metropolitan of Thebes and Levadeia

His Eminence; Maximos: Metropolitan of Serrai and Nigrita

His Eminence; Alexander: Metropolitan of Mantineia and Kynouria

His Eminence; Chrysostom: Metropolitan of Methymna

His Eminence; Panteleimon: Metropolitan of Thera, Amorgos and Nisoi

His Eminence; Evdokimos: Metropolitan of Eleutheroupolis

His Eminence; Chrysostom: Metropolitan of Edessa, Pella and Almopia

His Eminence; Iakovos: Metropolitan of Argolis

His Eminence; Agathonikos: Metropolitan of Kitros and Katerini

His Eminence; Nikephoros: Metropolitan of Didymoteichon and Orestias

His Eminence; Iakovos: Metropolitan of Mytilene, Eressos and Plomarion

His Eminence; Ignatios: Metropolitan of Arta

His Eminence; Hierotheos: Metropolitan of Lemnos and Agios Eustratios

His Eminence; Demetrios: Metropolitan of Goumenissa, Axioupolis and Polykastron

His Eminence; Ignatios: Metropolitan of Larissa and Tyrnavos

His Eminence; Constantine: Metropolitan of Nea Ionia and Philadelphia

His Eminence; Panteleimon: Metropolitan of Veroia and Naousa

His Eminence; Andrew: Metropolitan of Dryinoupolis, Pogoniani and Konitsa

His Eminence; Panteleimon: Metropolitan of Xanthi and Peritheorion

His Eminence; Alexios: Metropolitan of Nikaia

His Eminence; Hierotheos: Metropolitan of Nafpaktos and Agios Vlasios

His Eminence; Vasileios: Metropolitan of Elassona

His Eminence; Eusevios: Metropolitan of Samos and Ikaria

His Eminence; Serapheim: Metropolitan of Kastoria

His Eminence; Nicholas: Metropolitan of Phthiotis

His Eminence; Chrysostom: Metropolitan of Gytheion and Oitylon

His Eminence; Ignatios: Metropolitan of Demetrias

His Eminence; Ambrose: Metropolitan of Servia

His Eminence; Cyril: Metropolitan of Kythira

His Eminence; Thekletos: Metropolitan of Thessaliotis and Phanariophersala

His Eminence; Daniel: Metropolitan of Kaisariani, Vyron and Ymittos

His Eminence; Thekletos: Metropolitan of Florina, Prespai and Eordaia

His Eminence; Ephraim: Metropolitan of Ydra, Spetsai and Aigina

12. The Orthodox Church of Albania

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His Beatitude Anastasios: Archbishop of Tirana and All Albania

His Eminence; Ignatios: Metropolitan of Berat, Vlora and Kanina

His Eminence; John: Metropolitan of Korça

His Grace Kosma: Bishop of Apollonia

13. The Church of Poland

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His Beatitude Sawa: Metropolitan of Warsaw and All Poland

His Eminence; Simon: Archbishop of Lodz and Poznan

His Eminence; Jeremiah: Archbishop of Wroclaw and Szczecin

His Eminence; Adam: Archbishop of Przemyshl and Novy Sandets

His Eminence; Abel: Archbishop of Ljublin and Kholm

His Grace Jacob: Bishop of Bialystok and Gdansk

His Grace Miron: Bishop of Gaj Nowy; Vicar of Diocese of Warsaw and Bialy

His Grace Gregory: Bishop of Bialy; Vicar of Diocese of Warsaw and Bialy

14. The Church of the Czech Lands and Slovakia

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His Beatitude Nicholas: Archbishop of Preshov: Metropolitan of the Czech Lands and Slovakia

His Eminence; Christopher: Archbishop of Prague and the Czech Lands

His Grace Simeon: Bishop of Olomouts and Brno

II. Various splinter and fringe groups of Orthodox believers:

I. Unclassified splinter and fringe groups:

Click to View 1. Old Believers: Mr. Moisey Ovchinnikoff

Click to View 2. Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia: Metropolitan Laurus: Primate of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia

Click to View 3. Ukrainian Orthodox Church: Kiev Patriarchate and Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church

Click to View 4. Belarusan Autocephalous Orthodox Church

Click to View 5. Macedonian Orthodox Church: Archbishop Stefan; Archbishop of Ohrid and Macedonia

Click to View 6. Old Calendar Orthodox Churches

II. Independent Catholic churches:

Click to View 1. The Maronite Catholic Church: Patriarch Nasrallah Cardinal Sfeir; Patriarch of Antioch of the Maronites, The Maronite Catholic Church

Click to View 2. Italo-Albanian Catholic Church: Italo-Albanian Byzantine Rite

Click to View 3. The Chaldean Catholic Church: Patriarch Raphael I Bidawid; Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans; (A splinter group from the Assyrian Church of the East)

Click to View 4. Catholic Eastern Churches: Churches with No Counterpart - Italo-Albanian Catholic Church

Click to View 5. The Syro-Malabar Catholic Church: Major Archbishop of Ernakulam-Angamaly; Archbishop Varkey Vithayathil, Apostolic; The Syro-Malabar Catholic Church (A splinter group from the Assyrian Church of the East)

Click to View 6. Armenian Catholic Church: Patriarch of Cilicia of the Armenians; Patriarch Nerses Bedros XIX Tarmouni (A splinter group from the Oriental Orthodox Churches)

III. Holy Apostolic Catholic Assyrian Church of the East

Click to View His Holiness, Mar Kh'nanya Dinkha IV, Catholicos-Patriarch of the Holy Apostolic Catholic Assyrian Church of the East.

"How is Holy Apostolic Catholic Assyrian Church of the East organized? The Church of the East is governed according to the Apostolic model of bishops, presbyters, and deacons. At the turn of the fourth century (c. AD 310) Papa bar Gaggai, the bishop of the capital city of the Persian Empire, Seleucia-Ctesiphon, organized the bishops of the Church in a form which resembled the model developed in the West. He centralized the administration of the Church under his own jurisdiction and assumed the title "Catholicos of the East." From that time on, the bishop of the imperial capital held this office. The Catholicos became the presiding bishop over the entire Church, and his dignity and power were subsequently added to in the fifth century when he received the title "Patriarch". This was done at a general synod called by the Catholicos, Isaac, at Seleucia-Ctesiphon in AD 410. At this synod Marutha, a representative from the Roman Emperor, brought to the assembled bishops the canons and creed of the Council of Nicea, and they were officially approved and received by the Church of the East. Historically, the Catholicos-Patriarch governed the general synod of the bishops. The general synod was made up of all "Metropolitans" (Archbishops) and bishops. The Metropolitans were in charge of provinces, which each contained four to eight bishops. This historic model no longer exists due to the greatly reduced numbers within the Church and the dislocations of its membership. A bishop is considered legitimate if he has been ordained into the Apostolic succession by at least two (preferably more) other bishops who are themselves properly ordained and in full communion with their fellow bishops. A bishop's legitimacy endures only so long as he himself maintains such full communion." (CNEWA)

IV Assyrian Church of the East: Thomas Christians

Click to View Rev. Abraham Thomas Vazhayil Cor-Episcopa is currently the Administrator of the diocese, which has nine parishes in the USA and Canada. In addition, there are three Catholic Knanaya communities in the United States. (CNEWA)

V. Oriental Orthodox Churches

The term "Oriental Orthodox churches" is now generally used to describe a group of six ancient eastern churches. Although they are in communion with one another, each is fully independent and possesses many distinctive traditions. The common element among these churches is their rejection of the christological definition of the Council of Chalcedon (451), which asserted that Christ is one person in two natures, undivided and unconfused. For them, to say that Christ has two natures was to overemphasize the duality in Christ and to compromise the unity of his person. Yet they reject the classical monophysite position of Eutyches, who held that Christ's humanity was absorbed into his single divine nature. They prefer the formula of St. Cyril of Alexandria, who spoke of "the one incarnate nature of the Word of God" During the period following Chalcedon, those who rejected the council's teaching made up a significant portion of the Christians in the Byzantine Empire. Today, however, they are greatly reduced in number. Some of these churches have existed for centuries in areas where there is a non-Christian majority, and more recently others have suffered from many decades of persecution by communist governments. Because they denied Chalcedon's definition of two natures in Christ, these Christians have often erroneously been called "monophysites," from the Greek word meaning "one nature." The group has also been referred to as "the Lesser Eastern churches," "the Ancient Oriental churches," "the Non-Chalcedonian churches," or "the Pre-Chalcedonian churches." Today it is widely recognized by theologians and church leaders on both sides that the christological differences between the Oriental Orthodox and those who accepted Chalcedon were only verbal, and that in fact both parties profess the same faith in Christ using different formulas. (CNEWA)

A. The Armenian Apostolic Church (Oriental Orthodox Church)

Click to View His Holiness, Supreme Patriarch Catholicos Karekin II of All Armenians, The Armenian Apostolic Church

In 506 an Armenian synod rejected the christological teachings of the Council of Chalcedon (451), which no Armenian bishop had attended. At that time the Armenian Church was more concerned with countering the nestorianizing tendencies of the neighboring church in the Persian Empire. (CNEWA)

B. The Coptic Orthodox Church (Oriental Orthodox Church)

Click to View Pope Shenouda III, Pope of Alexandria, Patriarch of the See of St. Mark, The Coptic Orthodox Church The foundation of the church in Egypt is closely associated with St. Mark the Evangelist who, according to tradition, was martyred in Alexandria in 63 AD. Eventually Egypt became a Christian nation and Alexandria an extremely important center of theological reflection. Moreover, monks in the Egyptian desert provided the first models for the Christian monastic tradition, having been nourished by the spiritual insights of the early "desert fathers." But the christological teachings of the Council of Chalcedon in 451, partially because of opposition to Byzantine domination, were rejected by much of the Egyptian hierarchy and faithful. Persecutions intended to force acceptance only reinforced the resistance. Eventually a separate "Coptic" (from the Arabic and Greek word for "Egyptian") Church emerged with a distinct theological and liturgical tradition. From the 5th to the 9th centuries the Greek Patriarchs lived in the city of Alexandria, while the Coptic Patriarchs resided in the desert monastery of St. Macarius. (CNEWA)

C. The Ethiopian Orthodox Church (Oriental Orthodox Church)

Click to View Patriarch Paulos, The Ethiopian Orthodox Church Around the year 480 the "Nine Saints" arrived in Ethiopia and began missionary activities. According to tradition they were from Rome, Constantinople and Syria. They had left their countries because of their opposition to Chalcedonian christology and had probably resided for a time at St. Pachomius monastery in Egypt. Their influence, along with its traditional links with the Copts in Egypt, probably explains the origin of the Ethiopian Church's rejection of Chalcedon. The Nine Saints are credited with largely wiping out the remaining paganism in Ethiopia, with introducing the monastic tradition, and with making a substantial contribution to the development of Ge'ez religious literature by translating the Bible and religious works into that classical Ethiopian language. Monasteries quickly sprang up throughout the country and became important intellectual centers. (CNEWA)

D. The Syriac Orthodox Church of Antioch (Oriental Orthodox Church)

Click to View Patriarch Ignatius Zakka I Iwas, Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch and All the East; The Syriac Orthodox Church of Antioch The Syriac Church traces its origins back to the early Christian community at Antioch, which is mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles. The Antiochian Church became one of the great centers of Christianity in the early centuries. But the Council of Chalcedon in 451 provoked a split in the community. The council's teachings were enforced by the Byzantine imperial authorities in the cities, but they were largely rejected in the countryside. (CNEWA)

E. The Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church (Oriental Orthodox Church)

Click to View Catholicos of the East: Baselius Mar Thoma Matthews II, Catholicos of the Apostolic Throne of St. Thomas and Malankara Metropolitan; The Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church

In the mid-17th century, most of the Thomas Christians in India (see Assyrian Church of the East, I) had become increasingly upset with the latinization of their church by the Portuguese. This led thousands of faithful to gather at the Coonan Cross in Mattancherry on January 16, 1653, and take an oath to submit no longer to the authority of Rome. The leader of the dissidents may have attempted to reestablish communion with the Assyrian Church of the East, but in any case this was not achieved. Then in 1665, the Syrian Patriarch agreed to send a bishop to head the community on the condition that its leader and his followers agree to accept Syrian christology and follow the West Syrian rite. This group was eventually administered as an autonomous church within the Syrian Patriarchate. However, in 1912 there was a split in the community when a significant section declared itself an autocephalous church and announced the re-establishment of the ancient Catholicosate of the East in India. This was not accepted by those who remained loyal to the Syrian Patriarch. The two sides were reconciled in 1958 when the Indian Supreme Court declared that only the autocephalous Catholicos and bishops in communion with him had legal standing. But in 1975 the Syrian Patriarch excommunicated and deposed the Catholicos and appointed a rival, an action that resulted in the community splitting yet again. In June 1996 the Supreme Court of India rendered a decision that (a) upheld the Constitution of the church that had been adopted in 1934 and made it binding on both factions, (b) stated that there is only one Orthodox church in India, currently divided into two factions, and (c) recognized the Syrian Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch as the spiritual head of the universal Syrian Church, while affirming that the autocephalous Catholicos has legal standing as the head of the entire church, and that he is custodian of its parishes and properties. (CNEWA)

F. Eritrean Orthodox Church (Oriental Orthodox Church)

Click to View Patriarch of Eritrea: Patriarch Yacob I; Eritrean Orthodox Church

Christianity in Eritrea, which is located along the southwest coast of the Red Sea, dates back to at least the 4th century when the ancient Christian kingdom of Aksum flourished in what is now Eritrea and Ethiopia. The kingdom began to decline in the 7th century in the wake of Muslim invasions, but a portion of the Eritrean population always remained Christian. Subsequently the coastal areas were dominated by various regional powers, and fell under Ottoman rule in the 16th century. Eritrea was an Italian colony from 1890 to 1941, when it was captured by the British. It entered a federation with Ethiopia in 1952, and was annexed as an Ethiopian province in 1962. A lengthy struggle for self-rule culminated with the country's declaration of independence on May 24, 1993. At that time the country's Orthodox population formed a single diocese within the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. (CNEWA)

V. Splinter groups from the Oriental Orthodox Churches: Coptic Catholic Church

Click to View A. Patriarch of Alexandria of the Copts; Patriarch Stephanos II Ghattas (A splinter group from the Oriental Orthodox Churches)

Click to View B. Ethiopian Catholic Church: Archbishop of Addis Ababa of the Ethiopians; Archbishop Berhane-Yesus Demerew Souraphiel (A splinter group from the Oriental Orthodox Churches)

Click to View C. Syrian Catholic Church: Patriarch of Antioch of the Syrians; Patriarch Ignatius Peter VIII (A splinter group from the Oriental Orthodox Churches)

Click to View D. Syro-Malankara Catholic Church: Metropolitan of Trivandrum of the Syro-Malankarese; Archbishop Cyril Mar Baselios Malancharuvil (A splinter group from the Oriental Orthodox Churches)

VI Splinter groups from the Orthodox Church: Eastern Catholic Churches

These Eastern Catholic churches adhere to the Byzantine liturgical, spiritual and theological traditions of Eastern Orthodoxy, from which they derive. Because of the Greek origin of that tradition, most of these churches prefer to call themselves "Greek Catholic," which was their legal name in the Austrian Empire, the Ottoman Empire, and other states of Eastern Europe. Although this term has largely fallen out of use in the United States, where many parishes are called "Byzantine Catholic," the older term "Greek Catholic" is still used in the homeland of most of these churches. The two terms are used here interchangeably. (CNEWA)

Click to View A. Melkite Catholic Church: Patriarch of Antioch of the Greek Melkites; Patriarch Gregory III Laham (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View B. Ukrainian Catholic Church: Major Archbishop of Lviv of the Ukrainians; Lubomyr Cardinal Husar (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View C. Ruthenian Catholic Church: Bishop of Mukaèevo of the Byzantines; Bishop Ivan Semedi (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View D. Romanian Catholic Church: Archbishop of Fagaras and Alba Iulia; Metropolitan Lucian Muresan (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View E. Greek Catholic Church: Apostolic Exarch for Catholics of the Byzantine Rite in Greece: Bishop Anarghyros (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View F. Byzantine Catholics in former Yugoslavia: Bishop of Krizevci; Bishop Slavomir Miklovš (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View G. Bulgarian Catholic Church: Apostolic Exarch for Catholics of the Byzantine-Slav Rite in Bulgaria; Bishop Christo Proykov (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View H. Slovak Catholic Church: Bishop of Prešov of Catholics of the Byzantine Rite; Bishop Ján Hirka (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View I. Hungarian Catholic Church: Bishop of Hajdúdorog, Apostolic Administrator of Miskolc; Bishop Szilárd Keresztes (A splinter group from the Orthodox Church)

Click to View Learn from the Bible Blueprint, how the church was organized by the apostles! Click to View Find a local congregation of the New Testament church that is organized exactly as the Bible says Click to View 30-606 AD: The gradual historical Development of the Papal and Patriarchal Systems of Centralized Church Government away from the organization found in the Bible.

Edited and compiled by Steve Rudd

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